It’s Your Life

When I hosted our firm’s quarterly women’s luncheon last month, I again was struck at the community and support women offer each other. Although we talk about financial issues, it’s the sharing and honest discussion of what is going on in each of our lives that inspires and encourages each one of us.

Helen, in her late 60s, was recently widowed earlier this year. Although we take a conservative approach with her investments, it’s her lifestyle that is adventurous. As an international flight attendant for 38 years she spent her life in the air, however, in retirement, she spends her time in the sea — with 60 scuba dives under her belt by the age of 65.

However, Jennifer, also a widow, is quite different from Helen. Widowed at 27, her husband’s death left her alone with lots of unfulfilled dreams. Even though she had received substantial death benefits, they weren’t enough to last a lifetime. Yet, with all she had been through, it was important that she take a temporary hiatus from work. She allowed me to arrange her finances so she could follow her own path while she healed. She has just returned from a trip volunteering in Africa, and a short video about her experiences can be seen on my Web site at BahrGroup.com.

Maria, another case, also needed to take a hiatus from work. With a divorce settlement from her 32-year marriage, as well as savings from her job as a delivery nurse, she has spent the last two years volunteering and is now ready to undertake additional job training so she can get back to her career.

Then there is Renny and her husband, both retired, who experienced a health scare six weeks ago. As they were walking her husband felt pains in his chest, and he ended up having two stents implanted, narrowly averting a heart attack. But the surgery didn’t slow them down. They just returned from a square dance tour — 10 dances in 12 days.

She said, laughing, “It’s amazing that old people can have this much fun!”

Since both plan on to live a long time, their funds are invested for both income and growth.

Our firm follows the same basic principles of investing for each client, but we apply them very differently to each portfolio, depending on age, situation in life and need for current income or growth in the future; adjusting them as lives evolve. I think I have the best job in the world;

When I hosted our firm’s quarterly women’s luncheon last month, I again was struck at the community and support women offer each other. Although we talk about financial issues, it’s the sharing and honest discussion of what is going on in each of our lives that inspires and encourages each one of us.

Helen, in her late 60s, was recently widowed earlier this year. Although we take a conservative approach with her investments, it’s her lifestyle that is adventurous. As an international flight attendant for 38 years she spent her life in the air, however, in retirement, she spends her time in the sea — with 60 scuba dives under her belt by the age of 65.

However, Jennifer, also a widow, is quite different from Helen. Widowed at 27, her husband’s death left her alone with lots of unfulfilled dreams. Even though she had received substantial death benefits, they weren’t enough to last a lifetime. Yet, with all she had been through, it was important that she take a temporary hiatus from work. She allowed me to arrange her finances so she could follow her own path while she healed. She has just returned from a trip volunteering in Africa, and a short video about her experiences can be seen on my Web site at BahrGroup.com.

Maria, another case, also needed to take a hiatus from work. With a divorce settlement from her 32-year marriage, as well as savings from her job as a delivery nurse, she has spent the last two years volunteering and is now ready to undertake additional job training so she can get back to her career.

Then there is Renny and her husband, both retired, who experienced a health scare six weeks ago. As they were walking her husband felt pains in his chest, and he ended up having two stents implanted, narrowly averting a heart attack. But the surgery didn’t slow them down. They just returned from a square dance tour — 10 dances in 12 days.

She said, laughing, “It’s amazing that old people can have this much fun!”

Since both plan on to live a long time, their funds are invested for both income and growth.

Our firm follows the same basic principles of investing for each client, but we apply them very differently to each portfolio, depending on age, situation in life and need for current income or growth in the future; adjusting them as lives evolve. I think I have the best job in the world; helping my clients integrate their money with their lives to empower them to do what they dream.

 

 

Comments

  1. How about the displaced homemaker who loses her husband and father to their 4 young children at 39 yrs of age to suicide after a nightmare of watching the man of her dreams and life partner morph into a mentally and financially and emotionally abusive monster because of depression And drugs? She needs time to heal, heal the kids, recoup a sense of family that was torn to shreds, take care of the home, bills, shopping, sick kids, transportation, along with all the other things and formalities thst pull us in a million directions daily. What does she do to reenter the work force at A LIVAble wage.?

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